Search Results for "pee on water"
The Comedown by Justin Marks – Hardcover

The Comedown by Justin Marks – Hardcover

“What a moving and unusual book The Comedown is! A long poem, or perhaps a memoir in verse, or a dramatic monologue, it is both playful and yet revealing, honest and philosophical, formally innovative and yet direct.”

—Ilya Kaminsky, author of Deaf Republic and Dancing in Odessa

 

“Justin Marks’ singular voice contends with the universality of existential dread without artifice or grandeur, but rather in the most intimate, nearly imperceptible moments that render us human—fallible, but full of grace.”

—Su Hwang, author of Bodega

Earth Science by Sarah Green

Earth Science by Sarah Green

“With fluency and heart, the poems in Sarah Green’s Earth Science seem to say that beneath the surface of our common lives, our daily pleasures, nothing is stable, not family, nor the neighborhood, not the constellations, not even the sun a child was sure “stood still.” Love affairs, tragedy, even catastrophe, are simmering, most grippingly in the summer before the Boston Marathon bombing, when, in the poet’s lively Cambridge neighborhood The bombers were not bombers/yet, just brothers both younger than me, wrestling…/We were all very alive—/all of us and the brothers. (“Assembly”) I’m tremendously moved by the insight and appetite in this eloquent debut.”—Gail Mazur, author Forbidden City

The Comedown by Justin Marks

The Comedown by Justin Marks

“What a moving and unusual book The Comedown is! A long poem, or perhaps a memoir in verse, or a dramatic monologue, it is both playful and yet revealing, honest and philosophical, formally innovative and yet direct.”

—Ilya Kaminsky, author of Deaf Republic and Dancing in Odessa

 

“Justin Marks’ singular voice contends with the universality of existential dread without artifice or grandeur, but rather in the most intimate, nearly imperceptible moments that render us human—fallible, but full of grace.”

—Su Hwang, author of Bodega

In God’s Hair by Shannon Burns

In God’s Hair by Shannon Burns

Things that once seemed unrelated, or opposite, have slid together and overlapped. The world is melting. Existence is weirder. I am weirder. To read In God's Hair by Shannon Burns is to peer into a kaleidoscope with real gemstones in tiny, dazzling array. You will...

$50,000

$50,000

With $50,000, Weatherhead is a notary of the truth, scouring his cubicle, his relationships with coworkers and friends, and the worlds found in literature, sports, economics, and history for something more meaningful than mere facts. What arises is the pure drama of life: the unrelenting passage of time, the inescapable need to make a living, and the foreboding beauty of numbers, names, and friendship. In hundreds of standalone lines that shuffle like Mike Tyson’s peek-a-boo style, this long poem moves like prose but sticks with all the weight and heft of poetry.

“An aphoristic meditation collaging ‘facts’ (‘Facts are innocent, like flies in a room, not even looking for a way out’) with impressions, images, memories, quotations, passing feelings, $50,000 is one of those poems that could go on eternally—reading it feels like a kind of practice. A soothing book about language, loneliness, uncertainty, and the banal rhythms of existence: ‘I’m trapped in something less than history’ … ‘Our passion for living is not well understood.’

—Elisa Gabbert, author of The Word Pretty

Steep in the Boil

Steep in the Boil

Release Date: 12/18/2018

Advance Praise

“The latest marvel from Megan McShea charts the gray spaces of grief, giving voice to feelings that so often remain mute. Its narratives and fragments are filled with moments that will steal your breath, capturing those times when ‘reason fell off the fence.’ Knowing wisdom is worthless, it instead offers companionship and tender attentions. Steep in the Boil is a book you’ll treasure, even if sadness hasn’t found you yet.”

—Jeff Jackson, author of Destroy All Monsters

“Is love a poem that upon its loss, must be written as utter devastation, ruthless destruction, a terrifying appearance that simultaneous to its manifest of wound produces fresh (new but not renewed) desire and courage to go at it again? More than ever before? Well, if so, Steep in the Boil, written as a taxonomy in the form of a dense, breathy, tear-inducing mosaic divided in five parts, is love, is a heart-mind line for us grievers who, let’s be real, can’t read much anything else.”

—Rachel Levitsky, author of The Story of My Accident is Ours

Yr Skull a Cathedral

Yr Skull a Cathedral


Yr Skull a Cathedral is a collection of poems and translations—sonnets, song lyrics, ghazals and Sapphics. It’s a curation and also a pluralistic religious tract. Some of it is about cancer. Most of it is really awesome.


Blurbs!

“In Yr Skull A Cathedral, Param Anand Singh helps me unlearn what a poem is, what translation is, what punctuation is for, why capital letters, why songs. These ecstatic pieces show me how to be irreverent yet full of awe and humility. Read this book for its uncontainable interruptions, its compulsive speed and its careful ear. Here, language is useful in all kinds of ways, as ritual, music, or as a way to completely destroy everything, but with serious love.” —Madeline ffitch, author of Valparaiso, Round the Horn


Yr Skull a Cathedral is an enigmatic man at the train station who enters into your personal space and shares with you a highly personal and outrageous story from his life that challenges your beliefs.  As you sit on the hard, wooden bench and begin processing every beautiful image, arousing detail, and imaginative expression of what he just shared with you, he jumps up and disappears into a departing train. That is when you find yourself screaming out, ‘Thank you!’” —Eric Paul (Arab on Radar), author of I Offered Myself As The Sea


“What’s in a skull (hallow’d, hollow’d), that darkly bright ellipsis, cathedral of cathedrals, engine of engines, wilderness of wildernesses? Param Anand Singh knows and sings in and of this sacred resonant space-within-space through translations and transcriptions of language and light, devotional mutations of form and memory.This book (skull-like, a book of books, borderless, unlocatable) is living transmission, reciprocal and illuminated. Copy it by trembling hand.” —Jeremy Hoevenaar, author of Insolvency, Insolvency!

Lilith, but Dark

Lilith, but Dark

 

Nichole Perkins


Lilith, but Dark reveals a series of confessions and penances, exploring a southern black woman’s tour through lover’s lament. It explores intimacies from home to the schoolyard to the bedroom. It is a journey through tornado alley, a search for power and peace in the eye of a southern storm.

Official release date: July 17, 2018
Preorders ship in June

“‘There is a woman here, heady and blooming’ reads the last line of the last poem in this astonishing collection. And there is a woman here, heady and blooming in each of these infinitely resonant poems. With poise and precision, Nichole Perkins lays bare a black woman’s life, her love, her loss—how she has come apart and pulled herself back together, how she has wanted and been wanting. There is so much beautiful writing to be found in these pages, such a fine attention to detail, such a seductive way of imbuing each line and verse with intimacy and wisdom, so that we always understand how time and place have shaped the poet and the unforgettable way she renders this world.”

—Roxane Gay, author of Difficult Women

Strange Children

Strange Children

Strange Children is an emotional reckoning of medical trauma, marriage, family, loss, and adoption. In simple, direct language, the poems here are honest, hard, and hopeful as they explore the “loss of what we never had / but dreamt of—not allowed to dream / of that life any longer.” These are poems you can feel.

Read a quick Interview with Dan (and a sample poem)

Review at The Millions

Review at Smartish Pace

Dan Brady on Book Fight! Podcast


Buy Dan’s book as part of our 2018 Subscription ($50 for 5 Books)


Dan Brady is the author of two chapbooks, Cabin Fever / Fossil Record (Flying Guillotine Press) and Leroy Sequences (Horse Less Press). He is the poetry editor of Barrelhouse and lives in Arlington, Virginia with his wife and two kids. Strange Children is his first full-length poetry collection. Learn more at danbrady.org.

Pocket Finger

Pocket Finger

Pocket Finger is a book of illustrated stories from Ryan Call and Christy Call. Each piece was composed in alternating turns: Christy drew an image, Ryan wrote a text, Christy drew an image, Ryan wrote a text, and so on until they had created a collection of seven stories about childhood, ambition, blindness, family, loss, houses, and love.

Preorder now, shipping in March. Or read for free at RealPants.com where a new story is published every week in winter 2018.

Murder

Murder

Order Murder by Jane Liddle and prepare yourself for these fifty spare but homicidal tales.

Fiction | 68 pages | 6 x 8 in. | Perfect bound

Release date: 3/29/2016

The student waited on the subway platform. He wasn’t waiting for a train to ride but one to push a person in front of. He studied his fellow commuters. There was a father and his daughter who asked a lot of questions about the rats on the tracks, which the father answered ignorantly but with humor. There was an old lady pushing a cart that had a single milk carton in it. There were teenage boys who were friends and careful not to stand too close to one another.

 

Advance praise:

“Jane Liddle orchestrates the tragic lows of life, the dead ends, the interpersonal misery, the terror, the inevitable end, as if she was a conductor in front of the most joyously addictive orchestra I can think of. Her characters so startlingly human, so nuanced and real, in fifty instances of murder, I don’t think she has created a single villain.” — Bud Smith, author of F 250

 

“Jane Liddle’s Murder is about all of us. Everywoman. Everyman. Everyhuman. Taut reflections on the human experience and violence and fear and love and–lovingly, almost gleefully–murder. These stories evoke Amy Hempel and Amelia Gray, with sentences set to kill and intricacies set to create wonder.” — Sean H Doyle, author of This Must Be the Place
The Motion

The Motion

Order THE MOTION, the debut collection of short prose by Lucy K Shaw!

4.5 x 7″, 78 pages

Perfect bound

Release date: 3/31/15

There were so many layers of art upon art, everywhere. I was trying my best to ignore every one of them for a little while. But it never worked. I was always analysing from too many points of view. Always identifying intention when it didn’t have to matter.

Read about how Lucy became a writer.

Read an excerpt at Dazed Digital.

Muse /A Issue /THREE

Muse /A Issue /THREE

Issue /THREE of our literary journal features poetry, lyric essay, and art by Juliet Cook, Amy Pence, Shakeema Smalls, Tony Mancus, Michael Diebert, Kimberly Ann Southwick, Shebana Coelho, Samuel J. Fox and many more.

Irksome Particulars by Matt Cook

Irksome Particulars by Matt Cook

Prose poetry


IRKSOME PARTICULARS is a collection of terse, forceful prose poems. Matt Cook’s fifth book explores a literary landscape that is at once comic, sad, outrageous, and quotidian. Finding inspiration every where (especially in history, philosophy, the workplace, and the neighborhood), Cook delivers a sensibility that is both surreal and every day, welcoming and expansive. This is a book to keep handy for re-reading and sharing.

“Matt Cook’s Irksome Particulars is hilarious, irreverent, and sad all at once…” —Robert Fitterman, author of Nevermind

“This is a book you will read over and over and never pin down—it floats weightlessly, despite the weight of its intricacies and gorgeously exquisite language.” —Dorothea Lasky, author of Rome


About the Author

Matt Cook is the author of four books of poetry: In the Small of My Backyard (Manic D Press, 2002), Eavesdrop Soup (Manic D Press, 2005), The Unreasonable Slug (Manic D Press, 2007), and PROVING NOTHING TO ANYONE (Publishing Genius Press, 2013). His work has been anthologized in Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poet’s CaféThe United States of Poetry, and in Garrison Keillor’s Good Poems, American Places. Matt is the former Poet Laureate of Milwaukee, where he currently resides.

The Aleatory Abyss (Hardcover, Full color)

The Aleatory Abyss (Hardcover, Full color)

Evelyn Hampton’s long essay, The Aleatory Abyss is an essay about chance operations, spoofing, the election, people who live in malls, Mark [Baumer]’s walk, and trying to teach English composition at a rural community college. It’s available to read for free at Real Pants.

This is the hardcover version with full color photos taken by the author. It’s 80 pages long, 5×8′.

Please allow about 10-14 days for delivery. All proceeds go to benefit The FANG Collective.

The Aleatory Abyss

The Aleatory Abyss

Evelyn Hampton’s long essay, The Aleatory Abyss is an essay about chance operations, spoofing, the election, people who live in malls, Mark [Baumer]’s walk, and trying to teach English composition at a rural community college. It’s available to read for free at Real Pants.

This is the pocket version. It’s 80 pages long, 4×6″, B&W.

Shipping immediately. All proceeds go to benefit The FANG Collective.


Review

“Our current condition of ambient despair gets an excellent portraiture in Evelyn Hampton’s The Aleatory AbyssIt’s an obscure book about being obscure—or at least it is a book about occupying forgotten interstitial spaces and about being of and among technological detritus. In Hampton’s world we live our lives not in streets, schools, libraries, parks, or other public commons but online and in Barnes & Nobles, Starbucks, malls, parking lots, and other privatized spaces; that is, Hampton shows us a familiar world.” —Eugene Lim at The Millions

Mystery and Mortality (ebook)

Mystery and Mortality (ebook)

Order here and instantly receive the ebook in three versions: PDF, epub, and mobi (for your Kindle)

You can read this ebook on any device!


O’Connor and Ferrante. Franzen, McCarthy, Brian Allen Carr. Kathy Acker and Wallace—Mystery and Mortality is a collection of essays about literature. Paula Bomer focuses on the hardest things in life that inspire great writing, like the pain of loss in death, loss in love, loss in memory. Kierkegaard writes of the poet whose tortured screams from the dungeon sound like beautiful music to the king, so far removed. Here, Bomer’s essays bring us back to what we’re supposed to derive from literature: compassion.

Read a sample essay at New York Magazine.

Mystery and Mortality: Essays of the Sad, Short Gift of Life penetrates our scars and distills Bomer’s unfiltered self-examination of love, family, sex, and grief through an exhaustive research of some of our most vital authors. No one is off the hook.” —Meg Tuite, from the Introduction

Praise for the work of Paula Bomer

“Paula Bomer writes the kind of women’s fiction that critics like to call ‘raw.’ Her stark portrayals of biological womanhood have been described as raw and angry, raw and darkly funny, brutally raw and urgent. …Bomer offers her characters no outs.” The New York Times

“One third of the way into Nine Months, by Paula Bomer, I jotted in a page’s margin, ‘If you write about this book, do not use the cliche “unflinching.” (But that is the right word.)'” The Atlantic

“Bomer’s prose is crisp and breezy, often deceptively plain, her narrative voice veering from wise remove to a closeness that seems to jut an elbow outward, nudging the reader into complicity.” HTMLGiant

View tons of reviews, and much more, at Paula’s website: www.paulabomer.com

Mystery and Mortality

Mystery and Mortality

O’Connor and Ferrante. Franzen, McCarthy, Brian Allen Carr. Kathy Acker and Wallace—Mystery and Mortality is a collection of essays about literature. Paula Bomer focuses on the hardest things in life that inspire great writing, like the pain of loss in death, loss in love, loss in memory. Kierkegaard writes of the poet whose tortured screams from the dungeon sound like beautiful music to the king, so far removed. Here, Bomer’s essays bring us back to what we’re supposed to derive from literature: compassion.

Read a sample essay at New York Magazine.

Mystery and Mortality: Essays of the Sad, Short Gift of Life penetrates our scars and distills Bomer’s unfiltered self-examination of love, family, sex, and grief through an exhaustive research of some of our most vital authors. No one is off the hook.” —Meg Tuite, from the Introduction

Praise for the work of Paula Bomer

“Paula Bomer writes the kind of women’s fiction that critics like to call ‘raw.’ Her stark portrayals of biological womanhood have been described as raw and angry, raw and darkly funny, brutally raw and urgent. …Bomer offers her characters no outs.” The New York Times

“One third of the way into Nine Months, by Paula Bomer, I jotted in a page’s margin, ‘If you write about this book, do not use the cliche “unflinching.” (But that is the right word.)'” The Atlantic

“Bomer’s prose is crisp and breezy, often deceptively plain, her narrative voice veering from wise remove to a closeness that seems to jut an elbow outward, nudging the reader into complicity.” HTMLGiant

View tons of reviews, and much more, at Paula’s website: www.paulabomer.com

Hygiene in Reading

Hygiene in Reading

These poems use Edmund Burke Huey’s 1908 volume The Psychology and Pedagogy of Reading; with a Review of the History of Reading and Writing and of Methods, Texts, and Hygiene in Reading as a source text. Each piece draws its language only from the words in a single chapter of that book.


Patrick Williams was born on the edge of the Mid-Atlantic coast and grew to average height among the parking structures of Metroplex, Texas. He earned an MS and a PhD in Information Studies from the University of Texas at Austin studying what readers, writers, and technology do to each other. He continues to explore this topic through research and creative work, and through his role as editor of Really System, the journal of poetry and extensible poetics. He lives with his wife Kelly in Central New York, where he works as a humanities librarian at Syracuse University.

Beatrice

Beatrice

120 pages, 5 x 7.25″ paperback
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-8-8
Release date: April 26, 2016

Preorders will ship before the release date in mid April.

Philip Seidel hasn’t gone out much since his wife died—he’s too sad. He dreads the time that he’ll finally have to emerge, only to endure his former colleagues’ sympathy and concern. But then one day Beatrice, a former student of his, stops by with a care package stuffed with homemade treats. She’d been a star in his fiction workshop, and now she’s gone on to her own life and academic career. They become lunch partners and, in a way, she saves Philip by meeting him at the cafe every other week or so—until he oversteps the bounds of their relationship and drives her away, recedes back into himself.

Stephen Dixon writes with a sensitivity, pathos, and wit that makes the small lives of Philip and Beatrice seem much bigger, more universal, and—like everyone’s—crucial.

Nobody Dancing

Nobody Dancing

78 pages
Released December 15, 2015
Preview the Book

 

Advance Praise

‘“The newspapers won’t commit to a headline,” Cheryl Quimba writes. “Is the world ending or beginning?”

Nobody Dancing is a language world of gorgeous sound and perception.

These are poems of intimacy and estrangement, lyric tenderness. Yes, the world is ending and beginning all at once: each line an aubade to one moment, an elegy to another, beautiful lines crafted like flaming phoenixes decaying and renewing, decaying and renewing.

Cheryl Quimba is a wise poet, reporting back on the glorious oddball beauty of being alive.’

– Kaia Sand, author of Remember to Wave and interval

‘Quimba offers us hope in the form of a beat.

Nobody Dancing is a quiet invitation to shake your ass.’

– J Hope Stein, Poetry Crush

Figures for an Apocalypse (ebook)

Figures for an Apocalypse (ebook)

You will receive the download link for a 198 page PDF.

This is the second book in Edward Mullany’s brilliant, informal trilogy. It is made up of hundreds of short variations on a harrowing theme, which The Volta calls “timeless.”

“Charming where not terrifying, Figures for an Apocalypse rattles and haunts, glimpsing dystopic terror attentively, mightily, and minutely, and capturing the delicacy of ruin with grace. This book can sweep you up into a dark kind of care about the world, and probably should.” – Emily Toder, author of Science

 

The Well-Dressed Bear Will (Never) Be Found

The Well-Dressed Bear Will (Never) Be Found

210 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-4-0
Release date August 25, 2015

There is a bear loose in the city. He is violent and unpredictable. A menace. If you see this bear, please contact the authorities. Do not approach him, do not call out to him, do not follow him into alleyways or darkened places. Do not go looking for this bear. He is very dangerous. He is also very hard to find.

Check out “Those Bears,” a serial web comic, at Hobart.

In The Well-Dressed Bear Will (Never) Be Found, we’re introduced to the well-dressed but anxious hero, his telephone (which keeps misdialing), and his misadventures.

The One-Hour MFA (ebook)

The One-Hour MFA (ebook)

Want to save $50K on graduate school? In The One-Hour MFA, novelist Michael Kimball (Big Ray, Dear Everybody, etc.) gives indispensable advice as he breaks down the writing process into fifteen brief, meaningful lessons. Making detailed reference to some of the world’s best fiction writers, Kimball gives straightforward guidance on how to open a story and how to end one, how to revise and how to pay attention to things like syntax and acoustics, as well as various ways to think about character, voice, story, plot, and description.

Note: we are also serializing this book for free reading at realpants.com starting on July 7. Get these sharp and insightful essays for free in weekly installments, or order from Publishing Genius now and get everything at once. It’s great for writers and for teachers!

Check out the index to see the exhaustive list of writers Kimball refers to.

Here’s an article at FastCo about the book.

Here’s a review at JMWW.

Eat, Knucklehead!

Eat, Knucklehead!

220 pages, illustrated, paperback
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-1-9
100 recipes (mostly vegetarian)
Released in July 2015

Read an excerpt at Medium

An early review at Hopes&Fears

“It’s an epistolary novel of letters written from father to son, with 100 recipes interwoven throughout the story. Instructional illustrations, such as how to boil an egg or chop asparagus, are included too. Whether it’s family recipes being passed down generations, or the pleasure of making a good meal for a loved one, cooking is deeply tied to family. It makes thematic sense that a cookbook should be matched with a tale of a father who loves his son. This book should also appeal to those who understand that cooking can truly be a performance, or an act of creative expression, just like any other art.” – Hopes&Fears

The One-Hour MFA

The One-Hour MFA

90 pages, pocket sized, beautiful
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-5-7
Released in July 2015

Want to save $50K on graduate school? In The One-Hour MFA, novelist Michael Kimball (Big Ray, Dear Everybody, etc.) gives indispensable advice as he breaks down the writing process into fifteen brief, meaningful lessons. Making detailed reference to some of the world’s best fiction writers, Kimball gives straightforward guidance on how to open a story and how to end one, how to revise and how to pay attention to things like syntax and acoustics, as well as various ways to think about character, voice, story, plot, and description.

Note: we are also serializing this book for free reading at realpants.com starting on July 7. Get these sharp and insightful essays for free in weekly installments, or order from Publishing Genius now and get everything at once. It’s great for writers and for teachers!

Check out the index to see the exhaustive list of writers Kimball refers to.

Here’s an article at FastCo about the book.

Here’s a review at JMWW.

Man Bites Cloud

Man Bites Cloud

In Man Bites Cloud, Bob Schofield—illustrator and author of The Inevitable June(tNY Press 2014)—offers 60 prose poem fables. There are wolves on the moon, cannibalistic flowers, horses the size of planets, and magicians anonymous. All of these otherworldly characters come together to shed light on brief moments, but nothing here makes for revelations as much as new questions. Schofield brings us closer to seeing the veiled line between fantasy and reality. Like all fantasy—like that of the worlds behind closed closet doors and adventures stemming from unexpected parties—Schofield shows us there is room for happiness and loneliness, room enough for despair and hope.

also available at Amazon

Ebook Flights

Ebook Flights

This includes all three of our Ebook Flights:

  1. Invisible Women by Lily Hoang, novella
  2. Locked Away by Gabe Durham, novella
  3. Man Bites Cloud by Bob Schofield, flash fiction and poetry

 

Invisible Women

Invisible Women

You’ll receive a zip file that includes epub, mobi, and PDF files.

Invisible Women is really two books entwined in one, a dialogue between psychoanalysts that weaves through descriptions of luminous women. Told in a specific collective “we,” Hoang’s own voice becomes a compelling part of what’s being told. Just like Italo Calvino wrote of vast buildings constructed of words alone in Invisible CitiesInvisible Women presents complicated stories of feminine archetypes in the form of psychoanalytic case studies.

also available at Amazon

Locked Away

Locked Away

You’ll receive a zip file that includes epub, mobi, and PDF files.

In a land where cellars have just been invented, a new class of criminals—the kidnapper—begins to experiment with locking people inside their cellars. Here, a bean farmer, a fig merchant, and a vicious marauder prove humankind’s capacity for abusing new technologies in this strange world populated by dunderhead criminals, sad old men, and unsocialized children.Locked Away comes from the inimitable imagination of Gabe Durham, who gave us 2013′s hit novel, Fun Camp.

also available at Amazon

The Three Sunrises

The Three Sunrises

408 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-2-6
Released in June 2015

Read an excerpt


Read an interview with Edward at Electric Literature.

Vol. 1 Brooklyn published “The Holy Colors: a Preface to The Three Sunrises,” an essay by Edward about how the book covers in the trilogy reflect on the writing.

Here’s a review at Entropy.

And, of course, read the comic extra at Real Pants, in which his beloved characters sit on the stoop, reading his book.

The Three Sunrises is a collection of three novellas, and is the final installment of Edward’s trilogy, which began with If I Falter at the Gallows and Figures for an Apocalypse.

The first novella, Legion, is about a man who lives and works in a city during the time in his life when his mother dies.

The second novella, The Book of Numbers, is about two men who are lost in a desert and who are trying to make their way out of the desert.

The third, The Three Sunrises, is about a man who, walking one morning, sees his doppelganger, and who then follows this doppelganger around the city for three consecutive days.

Edward is also the author of the comic strip Rachel and Ben.

Valparaiso, Round the Horn

Valparaiso, Round the Horn

246 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9906020-0-2
Released in March 2015

Read sample stories at Barrelhouse, Sententia and The Collagist

The short stories of acclaimed playwright Madeline ffitch speak for themselves, loudly and clearly. ffitch is a fearless writer, and these 11 stories seem both magical and tethered to their rural landscapes. Here you’ll find a passionate scientist studying a forgotten species of Mud Turtle, a janitor who brings up his daughter in the basement of her middle school, a construction worker who actually minds where he pees … and a whole lot more. Throughout, you’ll be astonished and engaged by the colloquial fluency of her prose, the honesty of her piquant characters, and the intriguing and earthy backdrops that ground everything in this imaginative world.

 

Sprezzatura

Sprezzatura

132 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9887503-9-5
Released in October 2014

Top 10 Poetry Books of 2014 — Baltimore City Paper
Best Books of 2014 — Amy Lawless, The Volta
Cutty Spot Favorite Things Encountered in 2014

WHAT’S IT ABOUT:

Mike Young’s bristling new book is about love and fear and money. How do we know our feelings and feel our knowledge? It’s about stupid contemporary immune systems and being left to our own devices. If you’re on a bus or plane, you’ll be happy to hear there are a lot of those. Rollerblading, Lord Byron’s clubbed foot, pyramids, falafels, bridges, trains, buses, nightshade, mustard, tattoo, antlers, innovation, nerves, guilt, blood, strawberry cops, conclusive gameshows, moody strangers, and “the yes that keeps watch / over and under my breath.”

 

Mike Young “Can We Get Ice Cream At This Hour?” – In Place from In Placeon Vimeo

 

How to Catch a Coyote

How to Catch a Coyote

208 pages
ISBN: 978-0-9887503-8-8
Cover illustration by John Dermot Woods
Released in July 2014


Review at Buffalo Almanack

“In the hands of a lesser writer, the conceit of How To Catch A Coyote might have been doomed to fail, but I never stopped being impressed by the vibrancy of the voices in these narratives, how the book shifts tones not only from character to character but from the different chronological points in characters’ lives.”

Review at Electric Literature

“Crutchfield methodically undermines each character’s reliability so that the truth seems out of the reader’s grasp. The work is stronger for it …”

Review at Word Riot

“Subtle and wise, sparse and beautiful, gripping and evasive,How to Catch a Coyote is yet another winner from Publishing Genius, and a book I wholeheartedly recommend.”

Review at PANK

“Lines such as ‘Daniel already has a girlfriend, and a nice girl knows when she’s not wanted in a room anymore’ exhibit the relentlessness of Crutchfield’s prose—prose that’s packed with small truths that resonate beyond the characters.”

Review at The Masters Review

“This book embodies the coyote’s wild power.”

Review at American Microreviews

“Seemingly harmless on the surface, the novel digs deep, illustrating Crutchfield’s aptitude for exposing the dark and once there, showing the light that exists within it.”

Excerpt at Fanzine

Interview at Vol. 1 Brooklyn

” … nifty time shifts and perspectives that create a great read.”

Excerpt at Good Men Project

‘In “How It’s Supposed to Work,” Christy Crutchfield presents the struggle of a young man striving to be a “good boyfriend” while in the midst of the carnal desires that naturally assault when boys, young men, are faced with girls wearing summer skin, painted with freckles.’

Interview at Vouched

“The book, like Christy, is fucking fierce.”

Essay at Necessary Fiction

“… many of the characters in this novel are monsters or at least act like monsters …”

Playlist at Largehearted Boy

Review at HTMLGiant

” … a really good book to talk about with college students, and I think it would be a really good book club book, too.”

Christy writes about food at The Next Best Book Blog

Advance Praise

 

Welcome to Lafayette, North Carolina, where the coyotes are moving around at an alarming rate, where a sister simply needs “to move somewhere even as big as Raleigh to realize she’s not as special as they’re all encouraging her to be,” where a brother can’t make sense of his own life till he figures out what’s happened to his family. At once epic and spare, beautiful and ugly, Christy Crutchfield’s How to Catch a Coyote will make you question whether you ever knew the difference between a scavenger and a predator. —Mary Miller, author of The Last Days of California

Christy Crutchfield writes like she’s been alive for centuries—and not just alive, but taking notes. This book is wise in a way I’d almost forgotten books can be, as well as vivid and real and solid and sad. I read it, I loved it, and I hope that Crutchfield writes another one soon so I can read that, too. —Ben Loory, author of Stories for the Nighttime and Some for the Day

In Christy Crutchfield’s How to Catch a Coyote, a family tragedy happens and un-happens. A narrative unfolds, is denied, is reshaped. Each family member has a say. And then there is Daniel, who is a puzzle with pieces honed by that tragedy, by the saying and the un-saying. It’s his story that is actually being told here, the story of the storyteller. Crutchfield’s novel is also a puzzle; she’s masterfully cut the shapes and is letting the reader assemble the scape, and what a fantastic undertaking it proves to be. —Lindsay Hunter, author of Don’t Kiss Me

I think this book will be scary like a FOR SALE sign on top of another FOR SALE sign. —Mike Young at Electric Literature

The Kids I Teach

The Kids I Teach

28 pages, full color, velcro cover
Limited edition

Written by Andrew Weatherhead and drawn by Mallory Whitten, The Kids I Teach is a funny documentation of how elementary school students interact with their teacher.

Explicit content.

Preview it (in full) here.

Andrew Weatherhead has taught kids in Chicago and New York.  He currently lives in New York.

Mallory Whitten lives in Kent, Ohio.

Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (On a Postcard)

Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (On a Postcard)

186 pages
Released in August 2013

Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) started in 2008 at a performance arts festival. Over the next several years, Michael Kimball wrote over 300 postcard life stories, condensing over 10,000 years of life. Now it’s a book featuring the lives of, for example, Karen Lillis, Josh Maday, Red Delicious Apple, Blake Butler, Elizabeth Ellen, Moose the Cat, Chair, Jonathon Bender (a character from Kimball’s novel, Dear Everybody, Nate Jackson, J, Matt Bell, El Duque the Cat, Tao Lin, Rahne Alexander, Patrick King, L, Beowulf the Cat, Ken Baumann, T-Shirt, Stephanie Barber, R, Umbrella Cover, Andy Devine, Edgar Allan Poe, Abby the Horse, Michael Kimball, Brin-Jonathan Butler, Stephen Graham Jones, Catherine Lacey, John Quincy Adams, Shannon Sullivan, Soap and many more.

Reviews
Metazen
NPR
Guardian Weekend Magazine
Kenyon Review

Proving Nothing to Anyone

Proving Nothing to Anyone

86 pages
Released in July 2013

Reviews:
Michael Dennis Blog

Review at Coal Hill
Review at HTMLGIANT
2013 Tour Info


Matt Cook declared Poet Laureate of Milwaukee

ADVANCE PRAISE
David Cross
: “The thing about Matt’s writing, ‘poetry’ if you will, is that it’s funny. Not ‘funny for poetry’ but straight up funny. And thoughtful. And human. You won’t have to dig deep into layers of metaphorical self-indulgent word play to enjoy it either. It’s all right there for you. I enjoy Matt’s work on the same level that I do Daniel Clowes or Jack Handey. In fact he’s kind of the poetry version of their baby. If Daniel and Jack had a baby. I’m not sure that Daniel Clowes and Jack Handey have even met. But also they aren’t capable of having a baby so never mind. But you get my point.”

Leigh Stein: Matt Cook’s poems are very funny, but they are also little love notes from a man to his wife “who can’t find any of her socks,” to his best friends who “all have rocks in their heads,” and to his mother, who holds his hand “like it’s the last swordfish burrito on earth.” I would like to drink beer with Matt Cook and learn his secret to writing the fucking best sestinas.

Sommer Browning: “Matt Cook sings the unsung—the restaurant supply store, the backs of paintings—while teasing our unexamined lives. His poems point to our emotional slippage, revealing the Spanish Cement Mixer to be much more than the Spanish Cement Mixer. You’re all like ‘Nuh uh’ and these poems are all like ‘Uh huh’. I love this book.”

Sampson Starkweather: “Matt Cook is a walking Imagination, and naturally, the imagination has perfect comic timing and speaks with an amazing Midwestern accent. Matt Cook makes me want to move to Milwaukee. Now that is powerful poetry.”

Read: Two poems at Everyday Genius

Fun Camp (ebook)

Fun Camp (ebook)

Released in May 2013

Told in monologues, speeches, soliloquies, sermons, letters, cards, and lists, FUN CAMP is a freewheelin’ summer camp novel smashed to bits. Spend a week with the young inhabitants of a camp bent on molding campers into fun and interesting people via pranks, food fights, greased watermelon relays. Along the way, you’ll meet Dave and Holly, totalitarian head counselors who may be getting too old for this, Bernadette, a Luddite chaplain with some kids to convert, Billy, a first-timer tasting freedom, and Tad, a shaggy dude with a Jesus complex.

Review at Puerto Del Sol
Review at The Collagist
LA Review of Books (podcast)
Review at HTMLGiant
How Was Your Week Interview (podcast)
Review at Brooklyn Rail
Review at decomP
Interview at The Short Form
Gabe’s Book Tour Notes
Review at JMWW
Interview at Vol 1 Brooklyn
Book Playlist at Largehearted Boy
Review at The Fiddleback
Review at Tarpaulin Sky

Excerpts/Review at HTMLGiant

 

FUN CAMP was a semi-finalist for the Lake Forest/&Now 2011-2012 Madeleine P. Plonsker Emerging Writer’s Residency Prize, and an excerpt from the book was selected for the Wigleaf Top 50 (Very) Short Fictions of 2013.

Fun Camp

Fun Camp

166 pages
Released in May 2013

Told in monologues, speeches, soliloquies, sermons, letters, cards, and lists, FUN CAMP is a freewheelin’ summer camp novel smashed to bits. Spend a week with the young inhabitants of a camp bent on molding campers into fun and interesting people via pranks, food fights, greased watermelon relays. Along the way, you’ll meet Dave and Holly, totalitarian head counselors who may be getting too old for this, Bernadette, a Luddite chaplain with some kids to convert, Billy, a first-timer tasting freedom, and Tad, a shaggy dude with a Jesus complex.

Review at Puerto Del Sol
Review at The Collagist
LA Review of Books (podcast)
Review at HTMLGiant
How Was Your Week Interview (podcast)
Review at Brooklyn Rail
Review at decomP
Interview at The Short Form
Gabe’s Book Tour Notes
Review at JMWW
Interview at Vol 1 Brooklyn
Book Playlist at Largehearted Boy
Review at The Fiddleback
Review at Tarpaulin Sky

Excerpts/Review at HTMLGiant

FUN CAMP was a semi-finalist for the Lake Forest/&Now 2011-2012 Madeleine P. Plonsker Emerging Writer’s Residency Prize, and an excerpt from the book was selected for the Wigleaf Top 50 (Very) Short Fictions of 2013.

I Don’t Know I Said

I Don’t Know I Said

200 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9887503-1-9
Cover art by Craig Griffin
Released in April 2013

Arthur and Carolina are young and in love. When Carolina is involved in a car accident, she receives $80,000—enough to send them on the road to explore their lives and love. As they travel America, they try to figure out what to do with themselves, and what they will do in the meantime. And what does it mean if they don’t know? For a story of wandering and waiting, this is a book with tremendous impact.

Told in quick chapters with breathtaking, often hilarious prose, I Don’t Know I Saidis a novel that follows in the footsteps of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and Sheila Heti’s more recent How Should a Person Be?

Reviews
In Stet and an Interview
In Hobart
In Verbicide
In Flavorwire
In Coffin Factory
In Metazen

A Mountain City of Toad Splendor

A Mountain City of Toad Splendor

86 pages
ISBN 13: 978-0-9831706-8-6
Released in March 2013

This is an intricate and wowing collection of poetry and prose that asks “how is it out there with you?” “Approaching greatness sideways like ants without eyes?” Or “just beckoning horrors?” No matter the weight of your spirit or whether you have feelings for “a toffee, a tart, perfect bedlam,” Megan McShea bids you welcome to hike with her (keep your buggy fingers out of her special blend rutabaga trail mix, though) into A Mountain City of Toad Splendor.

WEB EXTRA: Megan McShea’s Youtube playlist inspired by the book.

Night Moves

Night Moves

86 pages, perfect bound
Released in February 2013

Thanks for making Night Moves a bestselling book of poetry in 2013!


Reviews and more at:
Book Club Guide
Bark
Slate Review
Coal Hill Review
Los Angeles Review
VICE
Baltimore Magazine
Other People Podcast (audio interview starts at 1:12:30)
The Nervous Breakdown
Baltimore Sun
Murder Your Darlings
City Paper
HTMLGiant
Baltimore Fishbowl
Saint-Lucy

Read an Excerpt at
poetrygenius

Here comes everybody, and they’ve sure got a lot to say about Bob Seger’s 1976 song “Night Moves.” Lifted whole from YouTube user comments, this book unfurls like a readymade litany of misspelled youth.
—Jeanne Liotta www.jeanneliotta.com

This is a sad and powerful book of love poems. Stephanie Barber understands how things are supposed to work and recognizes that they are broken, and Night Moves is a screenshot for the help desk in the sky. It’s a conceptual ode to Internet philosophy, solidifying the transient nature of online conversation.
—Kenneth Goldsmith @kg_ubu

Old Gus Eats

Old Gus Eats

28 pages, saddle-stitch
Released in April 2012

This chapbook contains stanzas fourteen through twenty-three of the The Odyssey by Homer, mistranslated visually from the ancient Greek. Polly Duff Bresnick’s process involves looking at the foreign shapes and symbols of the Greek in search of familiar, English words. This has been termed eye-rhyming, bad lip reading, or Rorschach writing. Here, the Greek and English are placed side-by-side so that the reader can judge the visual translations.

The chapbook can be read online, here, in full.

Post Nativity

Post Nativity

20 pages
Cover art by Stephanie Barber
Released February 2012

Read more about it in this advance post.
Read it at Chapbook Genius on March 6.


“Make me your pen, your two turntables and a microphone
Your air raid siren, your silence, the IED
Detonated, my brain slammed against my skull, Beast
Make me your staff, your sword, your brick, your bottle, your rod
You stacked me in a pile of other bodies, you took pictures”

If I Falter at the Gallows

If I Falter at the Gallows

84 Pages
Released in October 2011

Review at Rattle
Review at The Collagist
A 2011 No Tell Motel Best Of — twice

Edward’s Tumblr site

An Interview with Edward by Paula Bomer, at Big Other
A review at The Open End 
An illustration of the title poem by John Dermot Woods
An interview with Edward at NANO Fiction
Mel Bosworth’s review at the Outsider Writers Collective
Christopher Newgent’s review at Vouched
Tyler Gobble’s review at Vouched
Joseph Young responds at Very Small Dogs
J. A. Tyler’s review at Monkeybicycle

 

Simple Machines

Simple Machines

64 pages
Includes 8 pages of drawings
Released in August 2011
Ruth’s old canary is still alive.
The scientist picked a peach.
I am dangerous.

RedFez review

Praise for Simple Machines:

“Is Patty? Did Fred? You will never knowLet the sentence be your guide.”

Marvin K. Mooney, uncredited author of The Complete Works of Marvin K. Mooney

 

“It doesn’t matter what happens in fiction. Understanding this, Michael Bible has created an amazing document.”
Andy Devine, Author of Words

Featuring drawings by Lauren Bender, Sommer Browning, Zach Dodson, Craig Griffin, Dina Kelberman, Tao Lin, Ian White and John Dermot Woods.

Fog Gorgeous Stag

Fog Gorgeous Stag

72 pages
Cover painting by Chie Fueki
Released in April 2011

The Faster Times review
Book Punchreview
Four questions for the author
3AM review
NANO Fiction excerpt
Reviews at Hayden’s FerryMonkeybicycle

Fog Gorgeous Stag is an electrical fire of a book. From the first page you know it’s going to combust, and it does, and it will. Each sentence is wired evil, a sentient boll weevil, a morning devil, an angry lover hovering for some reason or other, a bleeding fever. Each image a starsong; a shelved elf; a microwaved marshmallow egg. This book is just not safe for human consumption. If you must read it, I recommend real thick gloves like the furries wear, a mouthwash month, some antiviral gum with Freshening Riblet Crystals, a hundred-year moratorium, or kevlar hot pants. This is not a blurb. This is a warning label.
—Ander Monson, author of Other Electricities

 

Arousing Notoriety / Your Trouble is Ballooning

Arousing Notoriety / Your Trouble is Ballooning

80 pages
“Split side,” with chapbooks by A. Minetta Gould and Amber Nelson
Cover art by Kelly Packer
Released in October 2010

A 2011 No Tell Motel Best Of

Arousing Notoriety is a collection of poems about affairs between peculiar characters named Banjo and Bear, Russia and Half Organ and Strong Heart. Gould edits the online journal Lonesome Fowl and is the Associate Editor for Black Ocean. She has recent work published in Columbia Poetry Review, Unsaid, and New Orleans Review. Another chapbook, Dutch Baby Combo and The Boys are Talking about Restless at Five Points, will be available from Spooky Girlfriend Press.

Your Trouble is Ballooning is comprised of eight sections of dense and lovely mysteries. Nelson is the co-founder and editor for alice blue. She has recent work published in H_ngm_n, Coconut, and Columbia Poetry Review. Another chapbook, Diary of When Being With Friends Feels Like Watching TV, will be available from Slash Pine Press.

 

Pee On Water (ebook)

Pee On Water (ebook)

You’ll receive PDF, epub, and mobi files

Cover design by the author
Released in September 2010

A Believer Magazine Reader’s Choice Top 20

Pee On Water, the daring first book from Rachel B. Glaser, is a collection of thirteen short stories of vivid imagination and ecstatic language. The first story, called “The Magic Umbrella” reads like an umbrella popping open. It features a flaming stick that talks and a book that ruminates about its place on the shelf. The title story at the end journeys through all of known time, and everything in between runs the gamut. From video games, to the NBA, to 9/11 and HIV, to space travel gone bad, Glaser’s fearlessness makes impossible stories possible.

Reviews
Charlotte Viewpoint
Kenyon Review
TriQuarterly
The Collagist
Chamber 4
The The
The Faster Times
We Who Are About to Die
Colin Bassett
Rumble
Big Other

Pee On Water

Pee On Water

150 pages
Cover design by the author
Released in September 2010

 

A Believer Magazine Reader’s Choice Top 20


Pee On Water, the daring first book from Rachel B. Glaser, is a collection of thirteen short stories of vivid imagination and ecstatic language. The first story, called “The Magic Umbrella” reads like an umbrella popping open. It features a flaming stick that talks and a book that ruminates about its place on the shelf. The title story at the end journeys through all of known time, and everything in between runs the gamut. From video games, to the NBA, to 9/11 and HIV, to space travel gone bad, Glaser’s fearlessness makes impossible stories possible.


More Reviews and Interviews
Charlotte Viewpoint
Kenyon Review
TriQuarterly
The Collagist
Chamber 4
The The
The Faster Times
We Who Are About to Die
Colin Bassett
Rumble
Big Other


Advance Praise
Glaser’s supple narratives reward the reader with dazzling effects.
Stanley G. Crawford, author of Log of the S.S. the Mrs Unguentine

Rachel B. Glaser is a party of one — smart, zany, and grave. Her stories move like nobody else’s among the beguilements and sorrows of being alive. A terrific debut.
Noy Holland, author of What Begins with Bird

Rachel Glaser has written a game-changer.
Giancarlo DiTrapano, founding editor of NY Tyrant and Tyrant Books

These stories are often dazzling, but beneath the bright wit, the weirdness, and the extraordinary invention you will find heart, guts, and a striking intelligence.
Chris Bachelder, author of U.S.!

The Best of (What’s Left of) Heaven

The Best of (What’s Left of) Heaven

208 pages
Released in March 2010
Cover design by Stephanie Barber


Reviews of The Best of (What’s Left of) Heaven
The Rumpus review by Joseph Goosey
Big Other review by Michael Leong
JMWW review by Ashlie Kauffman
Hobart review by Ethel Rohan
Harriet interview with Sina Queyras
Big Other interview (Adam Robinson on the “making-of”)
Review by Steven Fama


Advance praise
I’ve had to replace my copy of Talk Poetry more than any other collection in the last couple of years – it’s walked out of my house every time I’ve shown it to someone – and I’m preparing for the same thing to happen with The Best of (What’s Left of) Heaven. I think the thing I like most about Byrne’s poetry is that it makes me laugh like a monkey (baring my teeth, mad with fear, involuntary, like something being electrocuted) and like a human being (subsiding into my chair, telephoning someone to read it to them straight away) at the same time. Whether you open it on an imagistic collage or a coruscatingly funny interview, whether a hymn to the act of creation or furious, lyrical invective, it’s a beautiful, angry, generous collection and if you don’t like it you’re a fucking idiot.
Luke Kennard

Mairéad Byrne’s poems are moving microcosms in which a keen power of observation and playful imagination fuse with the minutiae of daily life to create small missives of quirky and insightful documentation. Her source material includes everything from the weather to credit card bills to news reports to human body parts to animal pelts and all of these seemingly disparate details amass into a kind of living, breathing envelope that holds the marrow of existence itself in all its harsh reality, weird surreality, absurdity, fragility, and occasional beauty. Often funny and sometimes sobering, Byrne’s work exposes the difficult-to-reconcile distractions, detritus, and rubble that surround us from all sides, but also culls glowing artifacts from such debris.
Juliet Cook 

A modest ma(s)terwork of colors & delights, of plays of language (lost & found), the push & pull of parody, of politics & domesticities, of day to day conundrums, of observations & inventions, of the connection (as she has it) of “small things to other small things,” of the oft-derided fancy as the brighter sister of imagination. These are some thoughts that flash by while reading Mairéad Byrne’s agile, humoristic, & deceptively profound new book. The best of, surely, & with a promise of still more to come.
Jerome Rothenberg

Words

Words

104 pages
Released in February 2010


Andy Devine’s Words includes two alphabetical lists (words that should and should not be used), a grammar on fiction writing, nine alphabetical stories, and a 90K-word novel (condensed to 20 pages). Michael Kimball attempts to explain all of it in the afterword.

As Day Same That the the Was Year” at Chapbook Genius
Robert Kloss’s Remix at Necessary Fiction
Davis Schneiderman interviewed Andy Devine at Big Other
Read the Devine interview with Josh Maday at elimae
Read Devine’s thoughts on prepositions at Unsaid

Easter Rabbit

Easter Rabbit

104 pages
Cover painting by Christine Sajecki
Released in October 2009

“Joe’s micro fictions are every myth and story whittled down to the barest of bones, to possibly one exaggeration, one lie, one meaningful, honest moment. They are so compactly intimate, absurd, and charismatic but also paradoxically vast and lonesome. Joe has so much faith in us, the reader, he invites us to peer into the scene and we become the ultimate voyeur into his constructed world. The relationship between text and reader becomes transactional, how much are we willing to give and how much do we want to take. The small texts draw us in and the white space requires us to go beyond the page, beyond the comfort of the words and to our own black box.” —BMore Art

Reviews:
NOO Journal
New Pages
The Short Review
JMWW
Matchbook
The Faster Times
B-More Art
htmlgiant
Big Other
Flash Fiction.net
Mungo

Light Boxes

Light Boxes

184 pages
Cover design by Adam Robinson
Released in February 2009

Light Boxes, the first novel from Shane Jones and Publishing Genius Press, received major media attention when the film rights were sold to Spike Jonze and the reprint rights went to Penguin Books.

The remainder of the initial print run, which Publishing Genius released in February 2009, quickly sold out. The book is available now from Penguin.

At BOMB Shane Jones and Adam Robinson talk about the book, with an introduction by Tom Roberge, who edited Light Boxes for Penguin.

Origin of Paranoia as a Heated Mole Suit

Origin of Paranoia as a Heated Mole Suit

Poetry and prose from Baltimore’s bard of the bookstore and editor of Shattered Wig Review.

“I have read The Origin of Paranoia as a Heated Mole Suit by Rupert Wondolowski. It is as good as the title would mandate being to warrant having such a bad ass title on the cover.” —Blake Butler Review at HTMLGIANT

CL Bledsoe Review

Goodreads Reviews


Rupert Wondolowski is the author of Mattress In An Alley, Raft Upon The Sea (Fell Swoop, New Orleans), The Origin of Paranoia As a Heated Mole Suit (Publishing Genius, Baltimore), The Whispering of Ice Cubes (Shattered Wig, Baltimore), Humans Go Outside to Hurt You, Shiny Pencils, The Incredible Sleeping Man, Cup Full of Head and Nightmare Rubber.

Six Off 66 by David Daniel

Six Off 66 by David Daniel

104 pp
Released in August 2007


JMWW Review
Ryan Call Review


Six Off 66 is one part old-timey radio announcer, one part Reader’s Digest condensed book, one part Jack Kerouac. Here you’ll find no kind of pyrotechnics. You will find plenty of the varieties of mystery that snake into your sleep on a snowy winter in Vermont or New Hampshire or Massachusetts. The news of the world—the trucker that comes upon that thing in the road near Ayres City, say, or the way the Japanese take their baths on Pearl Harbor Day—dwells among the fragments of experience that mean sideways things you know but can’t articulate: that black-and white land camera you hold in your hand in the hour before you board the Lone Star Limited southbound for Texarkana, that Chinese dogwood Paula saw and said was beautiful, that day Kenny said you smelled like a French whore. David Daniel’s milieu is pure Americana, but his sensibility is something stranger and vaguely European. If the setting were changed to Budapest or Paris or Prague, we’d know what to do with these stories. Instead, we’re left to reckon with the categoriless thing that sits at the intersection of oblivion and I-495. Let the reader beware.
—Kyle Minor, author of In the Devil’s Territory

These stories are beautifully written, as hard and glittering as diamonds. But it’s in their strangeness that we recognize the vagaries of human nature—that we recognize ourselves.
—Jay Atkinson, author of City in Amber and Tauvernier Street

These Here Separated (DVD-Institutional)

These Here Separated (DVD-Institutional)

DVD w/ 56-pagea
Cover drawing by Peter Barrickman
April 2007

(This purchase option is an institutional copy for public use.)


“The films of Stephanie Barber are insouciant forays into the very nature of existence.” – Baltimore City Paper Review


Included in this book and DVD are the soundtracks to six of Stephanie Barber’s experimental films. Reading the text while watching the films augments and enriches the understanding of Barber’s dense and lovely work. Out of the pairing comes a distinct, engaging literary and cinematic experience.

More Stephanie Barber reviews:
PGP Interview with publisher, Adam Robinson
at Afterall
at Artforum
at City Paper

These Here Separated (DVD)

These Here Separated (DVD)

DVD w/ 56-page book
Cover drawing by Peter Barrickman
Released April 2007

(This purchase option is for personal use only and cannot be used for public screenings. Please purchase an Institutional copy for public use.)


$200 Institutional
[click here to purchase for institutional use]


“The films of Stephanie Barber are insouciant forays into the very nature of existence.” – Baltimore City Paper Review


Included in this book and DVD are the soundtracks to six of Stephanie Barber’s experimental films. Reading the text while watching the films augments and enriches the understanding of Barber’s dense and lovely work. Out of the pairing comes a distinct, engaging literary and cinematic experience.
more Stephanie Barber reviews:
PGP Interview with publisher, Adam Robinson
at Afterall
at Artforum
at City Paper