Orange Juice by Timothy Willis Sanders

Ten years ago Timothy Willis Sanders put out this short story collection and it was an instant classic. Now we are happy to re-release it in a fun new way.

“I wouldn’t say Orange Juice was more fun to read than anything else I’ve read recently, but it was great fiction.”
Pank Magazine, 2010

Coming Soon

“Part confession, part tirade, part commentary, Justin Marks’ third poetry collection The Comedown, is a riveting, taut exploration into the toxic matrix of masculinity, capitalism, illness, the doldrums of perceived mediocrity, and the travails of the restless, seeking mind. Like a diamond drill bit, Marks bores into the heart of the matter: dissolution of the self, of marriage, of fatherhood, of youth, of the ego with precision, humor, and unflinching candor to expose stark beauty in a life lived hard despite its accumulated traumas and vices. His singular voice contends with the universality of existential dread without artifice or grandeur, but rather in the most intimate, nearly imperceptible moments that render us human––fallible, but full of grace.”

—Su Hwang, author of Bodega

$50,000 by Andrew Weatherhead

Friends cost money.

$50,000 is a long poem that allows Andrew Weatherhead the space to search everything—his cubicle, his relationships with coworkers and friends, and the worlds found in literature, sports, economics, and history—for something more meaningful than mere facts. What arises in these 116 pages is the pure drama of life: the unrelenting passage of time, the inevitable need to make a living, and the foreboding beauty of numbers, names, and friendship. In hundreds of standalone lines that align with Mike Tyson’s peek-a-boo style, $50,000 moves like prose but sticks with all the weight and heft of poetry.

“$50,000 is one of those poems that could go on eternally—reading it feels like a kind of practice.”

—Elisa Gabbert, author of The Word Pretty

$50,000 by Andrew Weatherhead

Literature. Sports. Economics. History.

$50,000 is a long poem that allows Andrew Weatherhead the space to search everything—his cubicle, his relationships with coworkers and friends, and the worlds found in literature, sports, economics, and history—for something more meaningful than mere facts. What arises in these 116 pages is the pure drama of life: the unrelenting passage of time, the inevitable need to make a living, and the foreboding beauty of numbers, names, and friendship. In hundreds of standalone lines that align with Mike Tyson’s peek-a-boo style, $50,000 moves like prose but sticks with all the weight and heft of poetry.

“$50,000 is one of those poems that could go on eternally—reading it feels like a kind of practice.”

—Elisa Gabbert, author of The Word Pretty

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